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Daniel Wiegand X Lilium : The flying cab

Since 2015, Daniel Wiegand, the founder of the German company Lilium, has been developing a flying cab prototype. And this is not yet another unmanned drone, it’s the real deal! This is a real aircraft that requires a pilot and is capable of taking 6 people to their destination in record time over a distance of nearly 300km. The particularity of this flying object is its propulsion mode. Rather than using a single large propeller like on a helicopter, Daniel Wiegand and his team relied on about thirty small fans that are placed in two portions of the aircraft: under the front moustaches, and under the wings. The most unexpected benefit is by far the drastic reduction of noise emissions. It is well known that helicopters are making way too much noise, whether you’re inside them our outside. To take off, the wings carrying small propellers are oriented vertically, then progressively take their horizontal position. Designed to be deployed on the roofs of buildings in modern cities, these flying cabs could well become one of the most popular means of transportation in just a few years…

Daniel Wiegand X Lilium : The flying cab

Since 2015, Daniel Wiegand, the founder of the German company Lilium, has been developing a flying cab prototype. And this is not yet another unmanned drone, it’s the real deal! This is a real aircraft that requires a pilot and is capable of taking 6 people to their destination in record time over a distance of nearly 300km. The particularity of this flying object is its propulsion mode. Rather than using a single large propeller like on a helicopter, Daniel Wiegand and his team relied on about thirty small fans that are placed in two portions of the aircraft: under the front moustaches, and under the wings. The most unexpected benefit is by far the drastic reduction of noise emissions. It is well known that helicopters are making way too much noise, whether you’re inside them our outside. To take off, the wings carrying small propellers are oriented vertically, then progressively take their horizontal position. Designed to be deployed on the roofs of buildings in modern cities, these flying cabs could well become one of the most popular means of transportation in just a few years…

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